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I re-landscaped my f... #188592

Asked 2014-06-05 16:07:41

I re-landscaped my front yard in St. Paul last week. One of the flower beds laid out by the architect is for brunella looking glass and I note that many of the leaves are speckeled with gray spots/some associated notching of leaf edges. Checking with the nursery, they tell me that their instock plants exibit the same feature and speculate that it may be rust or a fungus but that it can't be too serious, otherwise they wouldn't stock it. Would you agree ? Any tips on management ? I have to water adjacent new sod daily. Could this have a detrimental effect on the plants ? Thank you in advance for your advise.

Hennepin County Minnesota

Expert Response

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http://www.pestid.msu.edu/PlantParasiticNematodes/Foliarnematodes/tabid/111/Default.aspx For more information on nematodes. http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/help-for-the-home-gardener/advice-tips-resources/pests-and-problems/diseases/nematodes/hosta-leaf-nematodes.aspx 
 http://extension.psu.edu/cumberland/news/2012/jack-frost-brightens-the-shade-garden http://wimastergardener.org/?q=BunneraJackFrost  
Return the plants if you find nematodes.  Overhead irrigation will spread this worm to other plants so try to avoid wetting the leaves.

Pat Mack Replied 2014-06-05 17:13:16

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